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Our Cost

Investment Management

£250,000

  • Free Initial Consultation
  • Independent financial advice
  • Annual Renew Meetings
  • Online and Mobile access to your advisor
  • Holistic advice offering (optional)
  • Conventional investment management
  • Sustainable investment management
  • Islamic investment management

£250,000 - £750,000

  • Free Initial Consultation
  • Independent financial advice
  • Annual Renew Meetings
  • Online and Mobile access to your advisor
  • Holistic advice offering (optional)
  • Conventional investment management
  • Sustainable investment management
  • Islamic investment management

Above £750,000

  • Free Initial Consultation
  • Independent financial advice
  • Annual Renew Meetings
  • Online and Mobile access to your advisor
  • Holistic advice offering (optional)
  • Conventional investment management
  • Sustainable investment management
  • Islamic investment management

Book an Appointment

A commision is payable to Benjamin House from your chosen lender and product provider

Our Advice Process

Frequently Asked Questions

What is investment management?

 Investment management involves the professional management of investment portfolios on behalf of clients, with the goal of achieving their financial objectives. This includes asset allocation, portfolio construction, risk management, and ongoing monitoring and adjustments. Investment managers may work for financial institutions such as asset management firms, banks, or investment advisory firms, and they typically offer services to individual investors, institutional clients, or both.

 Sustainable investing, also known as socially responsible investing (SRI), ethical investing, or impact investing, is an approach to investment management that considers environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria alongside financial factors when selecting investments. The goal of sustainable investing is to generate positive social or environmental impact alongside financial returns, aligning investments with the values and beliefs of investors.

The key principles of sustainable investing include integrating ESG factors into investment analysis and decision-making, engaging with companies on ESG issues, promoting transparency and accountability in corporate practices, and seeking positive social or environmental outcomes alongside financial returns. Sustainable investing aims to drive positive change, support sustainable business practices, and address global challenges such as climate change, social inequality, and corporate governance issues.

Sustainable investing differs from traditional investing by incorporating ESG considerations into the investment process, alongside financial analysis. While traditional investing primarily focuses on financial returns, sustainable investing seeks to generate positive impact or address sustainability challenges through investment decisions. This may involve screening out companies involved in controversial industries, investing in companies with strong ESG practices, or supporting initiatives that promote sustainability and social responsibility.

 There are several approaches to sustainable investing, including:

  • Screening: Avoiding investments in companies or industries that are deemed socially or environmentally harmful.
  • Integration: Incorporating ESG factors into traditional financial analysis to identify investment opportunities and manage risks.
  • Impact investing: Investing in companies, projects, or funds with the intention of generating measurable social or environmental impact alongside financial returns.
  • Shareholder engagement: Engaging with companies to encourage improved ESG practices, transparency, and accountability through active ownership and dialogue.
  • Thematic investing: Investing in specific themes or sectors aligned with sustainability goals, such as renewable energy, clean technology, or sustainable agriculture.

ESG factors encompass a wide range of considerations, including environmental (e.g., climate change, pollution, resource conservation), social (e.g., human rights, labor practices, diversity and inclusion), and governance (e.g., board structure, executive compensation, transparency) issues. Specific ESG criteria may vary depending on the investment strategy, objectives, and values of investors.

 Investors can assess the sustainability of their investments by:

  • Reviewing ESG ratings and reports provided by research firms or data providers.
  • Analyzing company disclosures, sustainability reports, and corporate governance practices.
  • Engaging with investment managers or financial advisors who specialize in sustainable investing.
  • Participating in shareholder advocacy initiatives or proxy voting to influence corporate behavior.
  • Aligning investment decisions with personal values, preferences, and sustainability goals.

There is growing evidence that sustainable investing can deliver competitive financial returns while also achieving positive social or environmental impact. Numerous studies have shown that companies with strong ESG practices may outperform their peers over the long term, as they tend to be more resilient, innovative, and better positioned to manage risks and capitalize on opportunities.

 Investors interested in sustainable investing can:

  • Educate themselves about sustainable investing principles, approaches, and strategies.
  • Assess their values, goals, and risk tolerance to determine their sustainability preferences.
  • Research sustainable investment options, including mutual funds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and impact investing platforms.
  • Seek guidance from financial advisors or investment professionals specializing in sustainable investing.
  • Monitor and evaluate the performance and impact of their sustainable investments regularly, and make adjustments as needed to align with changing goals or preferences.

Active investing involves actively buying and selling securities in an attempt to outperform the market or a specific benchmark index. Active investors rely on research, analysis, and market timing to select individual stocks, bonds, or other assets they believe will generate higher returns than the broader market. This approach typically involves higher fees and requires ongoing monitoring of investments.

Passive investing, on the other hand, involves investing in a diversified portfolio that closely mirrors a specific market index or benchmark, such as the S&P 500. Instead of trying to beat the market, passive investors aim to match the performance of the index by holding a mix of securities in proportion to their weights in the index. Passive investing strategies often involve lower fees and require less active management.

The performance of active versus passive investing strategies can vary over time and depend on factors such as market conditions, investment goals, and individual preferences. While some active managers may outperform the market in certain periods, research has shown that over the long term, passive investing tends to outperform the majority of actively managed funds, especially after accounting for fees and expenses.

Proponents of active investing argue that active managers have the potential to generate higher returns by identifying mispriced securities, exploiting market inefficiencies, and adjusting portfolios based on changing market conditions. Active investing may also provide opportunities for investors to personalize their portfolios and pursue specific investment strategies or thematic interests.

Passive investing offers several advantages, including lower fees, greater diversification, and reduced portfolio turnover. By tracking a broad market index, passive investors benefit from market returns over time and avoid the risk of underperforming the market due to poor stock selection or market timing. Additionally, passive investing can be more tax-efficient since it typically involves less buying and selling of securities.

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020 7315 6500